Summing Up

Outlined below are my answers to the four interview questions in preparation for my Demonstration of Learning Conversation.

  1. Describe your philosophy of assessment and evaluation.
  • Academic achievement data should only report on a student’s ability to meet curricular learning goals/outcomes; it should not be influenced by behavioural data (i.e. attendance, attitude, missed deadlines, etc.). The two should be monitored and reported on separately.
  • Assessment/evaluation shouldn’t follow a one-try-to-get-it-right mentality.
    • Students should be given multiple opportunities to practice and receive descriptive feedback on their learning before they are evaluated. In addition, if a student is not successful on an evaluation, they should be allowed to re-try until their learning reaches an acceptable standard.
  • Students should be involved in the assessment process.
    • Students should know how they are going to be assessed so they can gear their learning accordingly.
    • Students should have some freedom to decide how they want to demonstrate their learning based on how they learn best.
    • Students should be given opportunities to assess their own learning (self-assessments).
  • In order to get a true and accurate picture of student learning, students need to be assessed multiple times in multiple ways (triangulation).
  • Assessment should not be random; it should be planned and purposeful.
  • Assessment should be used to guide a teacher’s instruction.

 

  1. Describe how you used assessment and evaluation in your field experience.
  • I utilized a variety of assessment tools, both formative and summative, that appealed to a variety of learners:
    • My Favourite No (formative)
    • Popsicle sticks (formative)
    • Thumbs-up check (formative)
    • Class discussions (formative)
    • Lab reports (formative)
    • Exit slips (formative)
    • Web quests (formative)
    • Journal entries (formative/summative)
    • Assignments (summative)
    • Tests (summative)
  • I involved students in the assessment process by outlining exactly how they were going to be assessed/evaluated so that they could gear their learning accordingly

 

  1. How closely did you assessment and evaluation practices in the field align with your philosophy? If there were discrepancies between your philosophy and practice, describe the barriers that prevented you from realizing your vision.
  • For the most part, my assessment and evaluation practices in the field did align with my philosophy
    • I involved students in the assessment process such that they knew exactly how they were going to be assessed/evaluated
    • I used a wide variety of assessment tools
    • I used assessment results to guide my instruction
  • However, not all my assessment practices aligned with my philosophy
    • In one of the classes that I was teaching, I gave a new assignment for every new topic, and all the assignments were taken in for marks. Furthermore, once the assignments were handed in, we moved on to a new topic.  In this sense, my assessment practices very much so followed a one-try-to-get-it-right mentality.
    • Some of my assessment practices also weren’t planned and purposeful, for in another class that I was teaching, my co-op instructed me to assign a mark to almost everything the students did––including things like class discussions.
  • Main reason for the discrepancies was a difference in beliefs between myself and my co-operating teachers, and since I was in their classrooms, I didn’t want to disrupt their way of doing things.

 

  1. Based on ECS 410 and your field experience, what are the three key learnings that you will take away from this semester about assessment and evaluation?
  • Formative assessment is crucial, as it guides both teacher instruction and student learning.
    • Formative assessment provides students with opportunities to practice and receive descriptive feedback on their learning before they are evaluated. In addition, teachers can use formative assessments to evaluate the effectiveness of their teaching and to guide their future practices.
  • The importance of triangulation.
    • Not all students learn in the same way, so relying on one form of evidence (like a unit test) to tell you what students have learned in not a good approach. In order to truly and accurately gauge student learning, students need to be assessed multiple times in multiple ways (through observations, conversations, and products).
  • Students should be involved in the assessment process.
    • Students should know how they are going to be assessed so they can gear their learning accordingly.
    • Students should have some freedom to decide how they want to demonstrate their learning based on how they learn best.
    • Students should be given opportunities to assess their own learning through self-assessments.
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One thought on “Summing Up

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